Jersey City renegotiates police union contract through 2025, awaits POBA, council OK

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The City of Jersey City has renegotiated a tentative agreement for the police officers benevolent association through 2025 that would increase the starting salary for cops – though the deal is still awaiting approval from the union and the city council.

Twitter photo.

By John Heinis/Hudson County View

If the deal is approved, it would go into effect on January 1st, 2019 and the starting salary for officers would be increased to $41,000 – up $4,000 from the current starting salary of $37,000.

Additionally, the city would restore two pay steps that the new officers lost during the arbitration period and restore longevity payments to officers hired after January 1, 2013.

“Over the last five years, our administration has hired hundreds of officers and today is another validation of our commitment towards our Police Department and safety of our residents,” Mayor Steven Fulop said in a statement.

“I’m glad that the administration was able to work with the Jersey City POBA to find common ground.”

Additionally, the city will increase the salary at top pay during the last two years of the arbitration award.

These are the last two years of service for the three large classes of officers who served for 23 years.

Back in October 2017, an independent arbitrator settled the Jersey City POBA contract, to the dismay of many members of the department.

At the time, Jersey City POBA President Carmine Disbrow said that Fulop “should be ashamed of himself” over the way the saga ended.

This time around, Disbrow took a much more positive tone when addressing the deal that will be going in front of his membership.

“This tentative agreement comes from many, many hours of, at times, tenuous discussions and will now be brought back to the nearly 700 members of the JCPOBA so that their voices can be heard,” he said in a statement.

Police Division Director Tawana Moody praised the tentative agreement, calling it a win across the board for the JCPD.

“Previous contracts cut starting salaries and put the savings into top pay; the $4,000 increase for new officers is over 10% and sorely needed as they start their careers,” she stated.

“We were also able to increase flexibility for our Police Chief, who is implementing innovative crime fighting and community relations programs.”

Furthermore, the city also touted achieving significant health care changes, which would be phased in over the next two years and an elimination of all longevity payments for new hires.