Hoboken transitioning to using 100% clean electricity for municipal buildings, operations

3

The City of Hoboken is transitioning to using 100 percent clean electricity for municipal buildings and operations, aiming to complete the switch by April.

By John Heinis/Hudson County View

“Hoboken is committed to improving our global environment through our transition to 100% renewable electricity,” Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in a statement.

“Utilizing wind and solar sources will substantially reduce our dependence on fossil fuels that contribute to greenhouse gases and global warming. This is a major milestone that puts Hoboken at the forefront of New Jersey in combatting climate change and upholding the ideals of the Paris Agreement.”

Once the transition is complete, 28 percent of Hoboken’s clean, renewable electricity for municipal operations will be generated within New Jersey by wind and solar energy, while 72 percent will be supplied by wind energy generated out of state.

The renewable electricity will also result in savings to the Hoboken taxpayers, with a projected 9 percent decrease in costs over two years.

Additionally, the City will pay less than 11 cents per kWh, which is approximately 1 cent per kWh less than the price to compare from PSE&G with renewable sources.

Previously, Hoboken purchased electricity from PSE&G for municipal operations, with 18 percent of the electricity generated from renewable sources.

The electricity for municipal operations will now be purchased through a third-party supplier, Aggressive Energy LLC, and was formalized with the city council unanimously passing a resolution sponsored by Councilwoman-at-Large Emily Jabbour.

Furthermore, Bhalla also signed a pledge today committing to a goal 100% clean, renewable electricity community-wide. The pledge is part of the Sierra Club Mayors for 100 Clean Energy Campaign.

To this end, the city will be soon launching a program to enable residents to purchase renewable electricity for their own homes.

The city passed an ordinance establishing an energy aggregation program, which will allow residents to utilize renewable electricity at cheaper rates than what they are currently paying.

Earlier this year Bhalla announced the framework for Hoboken’s Climate Action Plan, which is designed to exceed the standards set by the Paris Agreement.

Under this framework, Hoboken will aim to have municipal operations become net zero by 2025 and the City as a whole by 2030.

In January, the city completed the energy efficient upgrades in 11 municipal buildings including LED energy efficient lighting, as well as high-efficiency heating and cooling systems. The upgrades result in savings to taxpayers of approximately $100,000 per year.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Well, that’s nice but what about the North Bergen power plant?
    What happened to Jim Doyle’s resolution against it? Why did Ravi stop it?

Comments are closed.