Bhalla, Fulop announce plans for combined bike share program for Jersey City & Hoboken

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Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla and Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop announced plans for a combined bike share program for both cities, making a commitment to go out to bid and selecting the same company.

Twitter photo.

By John Heinis/Hudson County View

“Both Hoboken and Jersey City are leaders in advancing alternative transportation options, and we are thrilled to partner together to utilize the same regional bike share program for our cities,” Bhalla and Fulop said in a joint statement.

“Now, more than ever, a greater number of people are relying on shared transportation for essential services, employment, and more, and a regional approach will substantially improve the quality of life for all of our residents. And, as our communities continue to adapt to COVID-19, this coordinated effort will provide residents and visitors with healthy, socially distanced alternatives to mass transit.”

By choosing one bike share company for both cities, Bhalla and Fulop are seeking to achieve greater regional connectivity and mobility within both cities, making it easier for residents and visitors to travel within the two communities.

A number of residents within Hoboken and Jersey City regularly commute to and from both cities, and a regional bike share option will provide easier access to employment opportunities and improve both cities regional economies.

A regional bike share company will also help advance safer, alternative transportation options, a central component of both cities’ Vision Zero campaigns to eliminate pedestrian fatalities and serious injuries within 10 years or less.

Jersey City and Hoboken are two of the most bike-friendly communities in New Jersey, with a combined 75 miles of protected bike lanes, conventional bike lanes, and shared lanes.

Currently, the City of Hoboken utilizes Jersey Bike, while Jersey City uses Citi Bike.

On a vaguely related note, 1st Ward Councilman Mike DeFusco is proposing legislation that would allow residents to safely secure their bicycles in municipal parking garages.

The ordinance, up for first reading on Wednesday night, would create a permitting process with a $52 annual fee and require bicycles to display a small City of Hoboken placard, similarly to on street residential parking regulations.

Additionally, bicycles granted subsidized permits will be required to install and maintain front and rear tail lights.

“Over the past five years, I’ve continued to push for legislation and infrastructure projects that make our streets safer, more walkable and bicyclist-friendly for all of Hoboken,” DeFusco said in his own statement.

“As more residents rely on bicycles as their primary mode of transportation, it’s important for us to properly activate space within our city that reflects this shift. Sharing the street requires drivers and cyclists alike to work together and abide by the rules and the more bikes with lights on the road helps protect the safety of everyone.”

8 COMMENTS

  1. Are the other five towns that in addition to Hoboken currently use Hudson Bike Share on board with this? Having JC finally use the same bike share as the rest of the region would be great but there’s no mention of Bayonne, West New York Weehawken, North Bergen, Union City and Guttenberg in the story. I ride Hudson Bike share from UC to the Hoboken PATH every day – or at least I did before covid and it sounds like I’m gonna get screwed here unless Mayor Stack jumps on the Fulop bandwagon like Bhalla did.

    • Like Brian Stack really gives a crap about Bikes…. That guy runs his city like a Central American Dictator. Portraits of his dopey face in store windows ..( Protection signs? ) Hires all his friends. Keeps people fed but doesn’t encourage moving up and out. Loves keeping the town oppressed for his own little kingdom. CitiBike is way better than Zimmer/Next/Jersey Bike.

      Ravi is right on bringing in Citi Bike, get rid of those stupid Next Bikes that are laying all over the city blocking crosswalks, front stairs and hidden in people’s garages. Zimmer left and so should all the dumb stuff she did.

      • In fairness, Zimmer chose that service because it was slightly cheaper for residents. At the time Fulop was on board. At the 11th hour he bailed out leaving Zimmer holding the bag.

        Still as a regular rider with over 1000 rides in 3 years on citi, switching to a service that didn’t work in NYC would really suck. Probably wouldn’t bother.

      • If you have a look at that picture, you’ll see the problem for Hoboken. The Citibike racks use up parking spots. A 12 bike rack and kiosk like the one show would use up about 3 parking spots. From all I read parking is at the center of the meaning of life in Hoboken, so that’s probably why you ended up with a program that makes less use of street racks and leaves bikes on the sidewalks. They might be able to use places where parking has already been taken away. The zipcar spots would have been ideal. Now it will take some creativity. But I can already hear “the mayor is anti-car!” caterwauls starting.

  2. Your NJ citibike membership is also your NYC citibike membership. Ride down to the train or ferry in NJ on your citibike, ride across to the city on mass transit, get back on a citibike.

    Using a firm that only operates on one side of the river would double the cost of that scenario and sharply reduce interest in any program. Might as well use your own bike in that case.

    PS. covid is mostly transmitted through particles in the air, but it is possible to touch something with the virus and still bring it to your mouth/nose inadvertently and be infected. So bike-shares are not a covid layup. Making them more costly by going with a one-state solution would be way dumb.

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