Most Hoboken residents want Union Dry Dock to remain open space, survey says

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Most Hoboken residents want Union Dry Dock to remain open space, preferably part of a waterfront walkway and park, according to a survey the city recently conducted. 

Photo via betterwaterfront.org.
Photo via betterwaterfront.org.

By John Heinis/Hudson County View

“The people of Hoboken have spoken loud and clear: we overwhelmingly oppose industrial uses and want to complete our waterfront as public open space,” Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in a statement.

“Our community’s decades-old vision for a continuous, public waterfront park is as strong as ever, and my Administration will do everything it can to make it a reality.”

Based on this public feedback, the City will continue the process of acquisition of the Union Dry Dock site by initiating good faith discussions with the property owner.

In light of NJ Transit surprisingly opting not to vote on a measure to purchase the Union Dry Dock property earlier this month, the city conducted a survey asking residents what they would like to see done with the land.

Bhalla said at the time that eminent domain of the property, which was purchased by New York Waterway for $11.5 million in November, would be a last resort and suggested Red Hook, Brooklyn and Bayonne as two possible landing spots for their ferry maintenance and refueling facility.

The two-question survey, which had over 2,400 participants, warranted these results:

Should the Union Dry Dock property remain a priority for the City of Hoboken to have a complete, publicly-accessible waterfront park system? (2,404 responses)

Yes: 91.5% (2,200)

No: 8.5% (204)

What is your preferred use for the Union Dry Dock property? (2,447 responses)

73.8% (1,807): A public open space and waterfront walkway with no industrial uses. This option would be paid for by the City of Hoboken at a potential acquisition, design, and construction cost of tens of millions of dollars. Funding sources may include the Hoboken Open Space Trust Fund, County Open Space Trust Fund, and NJ Environmental Infrastructure Trust low-interest loans, among other sources.

13.5% (331): A ferry maintenance and refueling facility with a public open space on top of a ferry maintenance facility, with an inland walkway next to Sinatra Drive. This option would be paid for mostly or complete by NY Waterway.

8.1% (198): A ferry maintenance and refueling facility with pocket parks at the north and south ends of the property, with an inland walkway next to Sinatra Drive. This option would be paid for mostly or complete by NY Waterway.

4.6% (111): Other (open-ended responses)

3 COMMENTS

  1. NYWW is trying to move its refueling station out of Weehawken so that the Imperatore family, which owns NYWW and most of the Weehawken waterfront (hence via it’s now called Port Imperial), can develop more of the land it owns on the Weehawken waterfront into condos. We shouldn’t allow corrupt mobsters to destroy Hoboken’s waterfront (or anywhere else) just so they can make a quick buck.

    • NY Waterway is gonzo from Weehawken. They don’t control the property and it’s being developed and the town of Weehawken wants it that way.

      Do we want a NY Waterway or not? They need fuel to run the service.
      Going to Red Hook, Brooklyn or Bayonne doesn’t work. So what else?

  2. THe Trucking magnate family that owns NYWW has long had deals with Turner. Remember when Roberts and Turner tried to bail them out with public money?

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