JCIA Chief Oren Dabney on theft investigation: ‘We have nothing to hide’

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The Jersey City Incinerator Authority was generally mum when asked about the ongoing theft of services investigation, but CEO/Executive Director Oren Dabney eventually stated that the JCIA has “nothing to hide.” 

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When Hudson County View asked if anyone on the board could comment on the arrests of four JCIA employees earlier this month, including Assistant Executive Director Clayton Dabney – the brother of agency head Oren Dabney – general counsel Eric Tomaszewski stated that the JCIA is fully cooperating and have since begun their own investigation.

The Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office raid (assisted by the Jersey City Special Investigations Unit) took place at the agency’s headquarters, located at 13 Linden Ave. East, on July 2.

Furthermore, their attorney punted when asked what the agency thought about potentially being absorbed by the Jersey City Department of Public Works.

During a discussion about whether or not the authority should buy two new paper shredders, Commissioner Alexander Habib wanted to know how worthwhile the purchase would be if the JCIA may be a thing of the past soon.

“Do we not have, does the authority not have, the means right now to shred any documents? Habib asked.

“This is just regular stuff, we have old … nothing that would impair the investigations … these are basics. I mean dude … nothing to hide. We have nothing to hide,” Dabney responded over laughter from the rest of the board.

Dabney also explained that in the event the JCIA dissolves, all of their equipment would become property of DPW.

The measure to purchase the paper shredders passed by a vote of 5-1-1, with Habib voting no and Commissioner Oscar Velez abstaining, stating that he’d prefer to have more information on the purchase before casting his vote.

Clayton Dabney has pleaded not guilty to charges of theft of service and conspiracy for an alleged scheme where JCIA equipment was used to collect construction debris, which was later sold for cash (h/t The Jersey Journal).

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